Date
17 October 2017
Donald Tsang (in bowtie), accompanied by his wife, arrives at a court that will pronounce a verdict in a corruption and misconduct case. Photo: HKEJ
Donald Tsang (in bowtie), accompanied by his wife, arrives at a court that will pronounce a verdict in a corruption and misconduct case. Photo: HKEJ

Jury to resume deliberations in Donald Tsang corruption trial

The jurors tasked with deciding the fate of former Hong Kong leader Donald Tsang in his corruption trial are set to resume their deliberations on Friday after failing to reach a verdict yesterday.

The jury, comprising eight women and one man, raised some questions during more than nine hours of discussions Thursday on the high-profile case involving the former chief executive.

Tsang, who was the CE for seven years until June 2012, is facing a verdict on two charges of misconduct and one of accepting an advantage while in office.

Around five hours after they started deliberations at the High Court on Thursday, the jurors sent Justice Andrew Chan a note to seek clarification over one of the charges, RTHK reports.

The jurors wanted to be given what they described as a daily-life example to help them decide if Tsang was guilty of deliberately hiding his dealings with an interior decorator, the report said.

The request came in the absence of any direct evidence.

Tsang has been accused of nominating interior designer Barrie Ho for a prestigious government award without disclosing to the awards committee the links he had with the designer.

Ho had done some design work on a penthouse that Tsang had rented in Shenzhen.

According to RTHK, the jurors also came up with a further question on a separate charge.

That came as they were uncertain if the government’s grant of a digital radio license to a firm was directly linked to its part-owner’s alleged provision of free renovations for the Shenzhen penthouse.

But time ran out before the judge could provide answers to their queries, and they retired to accommodation at the High Court for the night.

The judge is expected to give them further directions Friday morning.

Justice Chan said on Thursday that he would only accept a unanimous verdict, or a majority verdict of at least seven to two.

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AC/RC

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