Date
24 September 2017
Enping, which won fame due to its hot springs resorts, is also gaining recognition for its food, which includes dishes such as yellow eel with baked rice (inset). Photos: baidu
Enping, which won fame due to its hot springs resorts, is also gaining recognition for its food, which includes dishes such as yellow eel with baked rice (inset). Photos: baidu

Enping offers more than just hot springs

Enping, a city in the southern part of Guangdong province, has suddenly found itself under the media spotlight.

That’s because Hong Kong’s financial secretary, Paul Chan, specifically mentioned the place in an interview in late April, saying Hongkongers can enjoy hot springs in the mainland city rather than travel all the way to Japan for such facilities.

While Chan’s pitch was understandable — he was touting the potential benefits that Hong Kong will reap from China’s “Greater Bay Area” development plan — there is no doubt that Enping is indeed a good place for people who like hot springs, such as myself.

Enping is the first city to be named “home to hot springs” in China, and that is why I like to go there with my friends several times a year.

But it’s not just hot springs that draw me to the Chinese city. It’s also the food, which is very delicious.

I was in Enping with my friends the other day, visiting the Jinjiang Hot Spring, where we got to relax by soaking ourselves in high-quality spring water full of minerals.

In the night, we had dinner at a restaurant called Lijiang, which offered great views as it is located right beside the Jinjiang Dam.

Several dishes we ordered were really delicious.

The mosquitofish soup tasted fresh and sweet, while the chicken and goose were also so good that one should not miss.

We were also lucky to have a big mottled eel, which weighed as much as 3.6kg.

It was served with the head and the tail stewed in casserole and the body steamed.

Finally there came the chef’s special-yellow eel with baked rice, which was really worth giving a thumbs up.

The eel was delicious as it was cut into small pieces and sautéed until fragrant.

The rice that came with it was jasmine rice, a unique type that is said to be only found in Enping. It tasted so good that I ate even the burnt portion at the bottom of the dish.

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on May 12.

Translation by Taka Liu

[Chinese version 中文版]

– Contact us at [email protected]

TL/AC/RC

HKEJ contributor

EJI Weekly Newsletter

Please click here to unsubscribe