Date
21 January 2018
Cinci Leung Wun-sien has been practicing traditional Chinese medicine for five years. Photo: HKEJ
Cinci Leung Wun-sien has been practicing traditional Chinese medicine for five years. Photo: HKEJ

How a Chinese medicine practitioner does business on Facebook

Cinci Leung Wun-sien has been practicing traditional Chinese medicine for five years, but she is anything but traditional.

The 35-year-old has been making her traditional Chinese medicine philosophy more accessible to today’s customers through her “CheckCheckCin” Facebook page, which supports and promotes her clinic, cookery books, as well as her herbal tea bars.

CheckCheckCin means “to check first” in Cantonese, and this represents Leung’s philosophy, which encourages people to check for their body type or constitution first, and make healthy decisions on food and beverage for a balanced life.

Leung writes short daily posts with bilingual health tips and infographics on her CheckCheckCin page for her 131,000 Facebook followers.

Spending hours to write the posts, Leung aims to explain complex theories of traditional Chinese medicine by vivid and easy-to-understand visual concepts. She believes Facebook posts need to come with a story that feels more human, and is able to capture the viewer’s attention and hold it.

“We need to post more vivid infographics in order to intrigue our readers to dig into the long article,” Leung said.

Initially, Leung wrote an average of 400 words for each post on her Facebook page, but she has been minimizing the length of the posts and is now using only about 100 words per post.

“Most people tend to skim through posts quickly and won’t read posts without good images,” she said. “We are learning as we observe and adjust to the era of social media we’re all in.”

Leung’s online fame has boosted her “offline” presence and business. She has been invited to write a column in a magazine, and has been giving speeches as well as writing cookery books on soup recipes.

She has started her herbal tea range and tea bars in Hong Kong. At her tea shop in Sheung Wan, the front is where they sell tea while at the back there is the Chinese medicine clinic, in accordance with the practice of old-school Chinese medicine tea places.

What is different is that she hires a “bartender” to serve customers with a range of mild-natured tea and rice water mocktails. “The whole point is to turn the clinic experience for patients into a happy-hour drink,” said Leung.

At her tea bars, Leung classifies her drinks under seven categories of conditions they aim to alleviate, including “feeling annoyed”, “feeling tired” and “feeling cold”. Customers simply choose the mocktail which corresponds to how their body is feeling that day.

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on Dec 27

Translation by Ben Ng

[Chinese version 中文版]

– Contact us at [email protected]

BN/CG

Cinci Leung has been making her traditional Chinese medicine philosophy more accessible to today’s customers through her "CheckCheckCin" Facebook page. Photo: CheckCheckCin/Facebook


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