Date
17 October 2018
Fashion and lifestyle incubation platform Azalvo plans to collaborate with designers and startups to foster innovation and co-creation, says co-founder Joanne Chow. Photo: HKEJ
Fashion and lifestyle incubation platform Azalvo plans to collaborate with designers and startups to foster innovation and co-creation, says co-founder Joanne Chow. Photo: HKEJ

Azalvo aims to help fashion startups, designers find their feet

Azalvo, a fashion and lifestyle incubation platform and co-creation community, plans to step up initiatives to promote collaboration and facilitate the transformation of Hong Kong’s fashion and textile industry.

Launched late last month, Azalvo aims to collaborate with designers and startups to foster innovation and co-creation and take the local fashion and textile industry to the next level.

In an interview with the Hong Kong Economic Journal, founder Joanne Chow, a third-generation owner of Aussco, a five-decade-old textile trading and manufacturing company in Hong Kong, said she recognizes the many challenges and burdens facing young fashion brands and designers.

“I believe in sharing economy and I want to provide access to resources, collaborate and guide the companies through the challenging process of transforming creative ideas into successful businesses” Chow said, repeating comments made during Azalvo’s launch.

Hong Kong firms can tap into years of experience of the Azalvo team and its suite of services, she said.

More than a co-working space for fashion firms and designers, Azalvo claims to cover every need for its resident companies at the design journey, from textile R&D, designing, upholstery, creating garment applications, marketing and branding, business matching as well as trademark, patent and prototype development, production, and more.

The company offers technology equipment and facilities including 3-D printers, a professional photography studio, display area and a fashion and material archive.

The incubator platform also provides access to research resources, retail insights and administrative support, such as referrals to lawyers.

Chow said about ten creative and fashion businesses in Hong Kong have already taken up residence at Azalvo as of now.

As the third generation owner of Aussco, which was founded by her grandfather in the 1960s, Chow said she had long felt the need to think about the long-term corporate survival of the company.

“Business transformation is never easy. If you are committed to reforming your business, you may have some employees resistant to change,” said Chow, adding that she hopes Azalvo is able to bring in a fresh look for Aussco, while nurturing a new generation in the local manufacturing industry. 

This article appeared in the Hong Kong Economic Journal on April 23

Translation by Ben Ng with additional reporting

[Chinese version 中文版]

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Hong Kong Economic Journal

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