Date
12 December 2018
After largely shutting out Huawei from the American market, the United States is now said to be trying to get its allies to shun the Chinese telecoms equipment firm. Photo: Reuters
After largely shutting out Huawei from the American market, the United States is now said to be trying to get its allies to shun the Chinese telecoms equipment firm. Photo: Reuters

US asks allies to shun Huawei equipment: WSJ

The US is trying to get its allies to persuade wireless carriers and internet providers in their countries to avoid equipment from China’s Huawei Technologies, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Citing sources familiar with the matter, the paper reported Thursday that American officials have reached out to their counterparts and telecom executives in friendly countries to warn them of cyber-security risks in relation to Huawei equipment.

Germany, Italy and Japan are among the countries that have already been approached, as per the report. 

Washington may step up financial aid for telecoms development in countries that shun Chinese-made equipment, sources told the Journal.

One US concern centers on the use of Chinese telecom equipment in countries that host American military bases, according to the report.

The advice to friendly countries comes as wireless and internet providers around the world prepare to buy new hardware for 5G networks.

Huawei had been labeled a security risk because of long-held suspicions that the firm may have links to the Chinese government.

The company has been largely shut out from the US market, and has been barred by Australia from supplying 5G network equipment. Also, it is facing increased scrutiny in some European markets.

Huawei has repeatedly denied engaging in intelligence work for any government.

The US briefings to allies are said to be aimed at dissuading governments and telecom executives from using Huawei components in both government and commercially operated networks.

The talking points emphasize how wireless and internet networks in a few years could be more susceptible to cyber-attacks or espionage. 

Washington has circulated its notes to national-security officials as well as to embassies, with the idea that they can deliver the message to foreign officials and telecom executives, the report said.

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RC

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