Date
15 December 2019
Riot police block activists opposing the extradition bill on a footbridge outside Citic Tower in Admiralty on Thursday. More protests are expected over the weekend. Photo: HKEJ
Riot police block activists opposing the extradition bill on a footbridge outside Citic Tower in Admiralty on Thursday. More protests are expected over the weekend. Photo: HKEJ

Group plans more protests, strikes to fight extradition bill

A pro-democracy group will press ahead with their protests against an extradition bill over the weekend as they call on Hong Kong citizens to pursue the struggle until the government backs down and retracts the proposed legislation.

Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), which organized the massive march against the bill on June 9, said a huge demonstration will be held this Sunday, not only to oppose the bill but also to condemn the excessive use of force by the police force against the protesters in the past days and demand Chief Executive Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor to step down, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reports.

The group also called on all workers, students and business owners to stage simultaneous strikes on Monday to show their opposition to the legislative initiative that would allow extradition to mainland China.

Convenor Jimmy Sham Tsz-kit assailed the police for filing rioting charges against several protesters, noting that the officers acted more shamefully by using tear gas and firing bean bag rounds, among other weapons, against them.

CHRF said it is hoped that people will wear black clothes and join the march, which will start at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday and proceed to the government headquarters in Admiralty.

Lee Cheuk-yan, general secretary of the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions, said he has applied for a letter of no objection with the police for Sunday’s march on behalf of the CHRF, adding that any application for a peaceful march should not be rejected.

The former Labour Party chairman also encouraged people to join Monday’s strike, noting that a non-cooperation movement is the highest level of protest.

Meanwhile, more than 10 pan-democratic lawmakers marched to the Government House to demand a dialogue with the chief executive, but police blocked their route and accused them of unlawful assembly.

Most offices near the Legislative Council complex in Admiralty, scene of violent clashes between police and demonstrators on Wednesday and Thursday, have reopened as of Friday as police officers manned the area to prevent protesters from regrouping.

The Admiralty MTR Station resumed normal operations from 2 p.m. on Thursday after it was closed on Wednesday in view of the massive demonstration in the vicinity of Legco.

Some protesters had also tried to converge on the platforms at the Tiu Keng Leng MTR Station in the morning and activated the alarm system in an apparent bid to paralyze train operations, but the situation normalized in the afternoon. 

– Contact us at [email protected]

TL/JC/CG